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The heart-warming story of how workers saved the job of their company’s chief executive

E. J. Dionne has the story HERE: Who knew that one of the best made-for-Labor-Day speeches in U.S. history would be delivered by a chief executive? And who could have guessed that the summer’s major labor story would not be about a CEO saving the jobs of his workers but about the workers saving the job of their CEO? This is the wonder of the happy-ending tale of Market Basket, the New England grocery chain. Most of its 25,000 non-unionized workers walked out to get their deposed CEO, Arthur T. Demoulas, reinstated as the company’s leader....

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Is it too late to reverse the ominous trend of climate change?

The term “tipping point” is defined as the point at which a series of small changes or incidents becomes significant enough to cause a larger, more important change. In an ever-changing world, tipping points abound, but perhaps no more ominously than with regard to climate change. Consider THIS: There is an alarming message in a major new report on climate change, a draft of which the New York Times obtained on Tuesday. The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a group of leading scientists who review the...

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This political forecaster says the Republicans may not win control of the Senate after all

For months now, conventional political wisdom has been that Republicans are likely to gain control of the U.S. Senate in the November elections. But a significant expression of doubt about that consensus has arisen, and it comes from a guy with an impressive record of accurate election forecasts. Sam Wang (above), a 47-year-old analyst for the Princeton Election Consortium, says Democratic candidates for the Senate are “doing surprisingly well,” and his latest “snapshot” puts the Dems’ chances of maintaining...

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Cheer up! Your IQ test scores might get better over time

If you’re intelligent enough to read this blog post (or any of my other stuff, for that matter), you’re probably also intelligent enough to improve your scores on IQ tests. The explanation is HERE: We’re getting more stupid. That’s one point made in a recent article in the New Scientist, reporting on a gradual decline in IQs in developed countries such as the UK, Australia and the Netherlands. Such research feeds into a long-held fascination with testing human intelligence. Yet such debates are too focused on IQ as a life-long...

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Report from two Republican groups says women think the party is stuck in the past

The only surprise HERE is that the report was commissioned by Republicans themselves: A detailed report commissioned by two major Republican groups — including one backed by Karl Rove — paints a dismal picture for Republicans, concluding female voters view the party as “intolerant,” “lacking in compassion” and “stuck in the past.” Women are “barely receptive” to Republicans’ policies, and the party does “especially poorly” with women in the Northeast and Midwest, according to an internal Crossroads GPS and American Action Network report...

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Behold the psychological shift among Americans with regard to global warming

As the experiential impact of global warming on our daily lives increases — the steady drumbeat of climate-related disasters around the world — psychological changes are occurring among the American populace. Robert Jay Lifton EXPLAINS: Americans appear to be undergoing a significant psychological shift in our relation to global warming. I call this shift a climate “swerve,” borrowing the term used recently by the Harvard humanities professor Stephen Greenblatt to describe a major historical change in consciousness that is neither...

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Paul Ryan’s list of his six favorite books has one very curious omission

Paul Ryan, the Republican congressman and former vice presidential candidate from up the road in Janesville, Wis., was asked the other day to list his six favorite books on economics and government. A pertinent question for a so-called heavy thinker, right? But Ryan’s response was peculiar, not so much for what he included on his list but for what he excluded: There were no books by crackpot political philosopher Ayn Rand. (See HERE.) Speaking of lists, Jonathan Chait has put together a few examples of things Rep. Paul Ryan has SAID OR...

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Here’s the secret formula for how Fox News peddles conspiracy theories and other bunk

If you Google the terms “Fox News” and “some people are saying,” you get more than 17 million results. Indeed, hardly a day, or even an hour, goes by without one of the talking heads on Fox News Channel referring to how “some people are saying” something or other that fits the channel’s political biases. These “some people” are rarely identified, and the stuff they’re purportedly “saying” is rarely supported by solid evidence. You see, this is how Fox creates and spreads...

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Doomsday Preppers are a fascinating sub-species of American weirdos

I don’t watch it as often as I should, but I find that TV show about “Doomsday Preppers” invariably entertaining — and not merely as comedy. I’m fascinated, for example, by the great variety of paranoid notions among preppers. Some are fearful of a race war. Others foresee environmental catastrophes or a pandemic caused by some mystery virus. Still others are predicting a foreign invasion. And then there are people who foresee an impending war with their own government. People like THESE GUYS: A group of...

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Memo to Fox News: Here’s the real War on Christmas

While channel-surfing this morning, I happened upon QVC, one of the shopping channels, and noticed that the program was titled “Countdown to Christmas.” Countdown to Christmas? Whoa! Temperatures here in the Heartland are expected to reach into the 90s today. It’s August 25th, not December 25th. That’s  still four months away. Yes, we’ve come to expect — albeit regrettably — that Christmas season now starts even before Halloween. But August? Give us a break. Why isn’t Fox News on this case? The...

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Will the success of Chicago’s Little League team spur interest in baseball among black kids?

Most folks probably would be surprised to learn that only eight percent of Major League Baseball players are African-Americans. It may seem that there are more, but that’s mainly because so many ballplayers are blacks from Latin countries. In contrast, roughly three-fourths of players in the National Basketball Association and two-thirds in the National Football League are African-Americans. There are various socio-economic factors behind the decline of American blacks in big league baseball from a high of one in five players to barely...

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Study shows a political shift of sorts as more people move from blue states to red states

The political map of America never stays the same for very long. Attitudes change, and people move around, resulting in different blends of Republican red and Democratic blue in the various states. HERE‘s a look at the changes of late: Over the last few decades, residents of many traditionally liberal states have moved to states that were once more conservative. And this pattern has played an important role in helping the Democratic Party win the last two presidential elections and four of the last six. The growth of the Latino...

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