|

The end of football as we know it?

In a post here this past New Year’s Day, one of my fearless predictions for 2012 read as follows:

“The sport of football will face an existential crisis amid a spate of fatal injuries.”

Well, there hasn’t exactly been that spate of fatal injuries, but injuries nevertheless are creating huge problems for football — especially the NFL.

For starters, a flurry of new research into the long-term effects of head concussions among football players is prompting a serious re-examination of the sport at every level.

And then there’s the rash of lawsuits that ACCUSE THE NFL of  “hiding information that linked football-related head trauma to permanent brain injuries.”

Share:

3 Comments

  1. expdoc

    Yes. It is the end of football as we know it. I predict that within a few years kickoffs will be a thing of the past, penalties for illegal hits will be significantly strengthened and requirements for neuropsychological testing for the players will be increased.

    If the NFL doesn’t get really serious about this issue they won’t just lose lawsuits. Fewer and fewer young kids are going to play football and the pipeline of good young players is going to dry up.

  2. Well said, doc. (God, I hate admitting that.)

  3. monkey

    My young son is a fantastic athlete and has often asked about playing football. Not a chance, my wife and I have said. She works in health care and has seen the devastating injuries incurred by football players at the HS and college level. Those who say, “aww, c’
    mon, just take it like a man and play,” will soon begin to be outnumbered. The game is going to have to change significantly or there is definitely a chance it could fade away. A few years of glory for a lifetime of misery is not worth it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CAPTCHA Image

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>