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Report: Romney camp is vetting Paul Ryan for veep spot

I have no reason to doubt that THIS is true.

But I have good reason to doubt that the Janesville genius will end up getting the nod.

It boils down to this: Ryan’s budget plan is too controversial. The Obama campaign would have a field day attacking it.

Romney’s running-mate choice likely will be someone relatively bland and safe.

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3 Comments

  1. expdoc

    Truth is always controversial isn’t it Pat?

    Jonah Goldberg thinks that the hard truth of our fiscal situation might spell doom for the Democrats.

    http://townhall.com/columnists/jonahgoldberg/2012/06/20/are_the_dems_doomed/page/full/

    The problem for the Democratic Party is that its core philosophy and mechanisms are increasingly ill-suited to our times.

    In an essay for National Affairs titled “The Politics of Loss,” Jay Cost recounts how the entire edifice of post-World War II politics is starting to crumble under the weight of debt and impending austerity. “The days when lawmakers could give to some Americans without shortchanging others are over; the politics of deciding who loses what, and when and how, is upon us,” Cost writes. He’s undoubtedly right when he adds, “Neither party yet fully understands the implications of this shift, which means both parties risk being caught unprepared when the economic slowdown forces profound changes in American politics.”

    But there’s a key difference between the parties. The Democrats tend to be more traditionally coalitional: If everyone sticks together, everyone gets paid. In the age of austerity, however, zero-sum politics become more of the norm. When one constituency’s victory is another’s loss, the payoff for solidarity diminishes.

    Already, across the country, there’s a growing rift between unions in the public sector and the private sector, perhaps not in official statements but clearly in terms of rank-and-file voters and popular perceptions. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker got 37 percent of the vote from union households in his recall fight, in part because private sector union members understood how much the private sector needed a healthy state economy.

    More broadly, the old system of rewarding liberal elites on cultural and environmental issues while paying off the working class with economic spoils will be increasingly hard to sustain. Obama’s positions on gay marriage and the Keystone XL pipeline fuel donations from celebrity millionaires, but they don’t help with middle- and lower-class voters. And if those voters get no payoff from voting Democratic, what’s the point?

    Consider Obama’s decision to grant work permits to perhaps 1 million young illegal immigrants. In a booming economy that would be a lot easier. Instead, the White House must tell millions of unemployed blacks that the competition for jobs has just gotten tougher because Obama needs more Latino votes.

  2. shawnnews

    When has Jonah Goldberg been right about anything? I can’t tell you a single time. Can you?

  3. expdoc

    Shawn,

    You’re usually a better liberal than that. Try addressing his points rather than attacking the man. He makes some excellent points in this article and clearly this paragraph is right on:

    “Already, across the country, there’s a growing rift between unions in the public sector and the private sector, perhaps not in official statements but clearly in terms of rank-and-file voters and popular perceptions. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker got 37 percent of the vote from union households in his recall fight, in part because private sector union members understood how much the private sector needed a healthy state economy. “

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