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Family Research Council opposes hate law under which shooter might be prosecuted

Some lunatic with a gun shot and wounded a security guard yesterday at the Washington offices of the Family Research Council.

Reports that the shooter was upset with the FRC’s positions on gay rights raises the possibility that he might be charged with a hate crime.

Ironically, the FRC doesn’t like hate-crime statutes, as we see HERE:

While the FRC has specifically opposed expanding hate crimes protections to individuals targeted for violent attacks because of their sexual orientation or gender identity because they believe it “sends the false message that deviant sexual behaviors are somehow equivalent to other categories of protection such as race or sex,” the group also opposes any hate crimes law on principle.

“Violent attacks upon people or property are already illegal, regardless of the motive behind them. With ‘hate crime’ laws, however, people are essentially given one penalty for the actions they engaged in, and an additional penalty for the politically incorrect thoughts that allegedly motivated those actions,” the group states on its website.

I’m inclined to agree with the FRC on this matter. Hate-crime laws give me pause.

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1 Comment

  1. esperando

    “With ‘hate crime’ laws, however, people are essentially given one penalty for the actions they engaged in, and an additional penalty for the politically incorrect thoughts that allegedly motivated those actions.”

    Yes, because we never consider motives when assigning sentences, that’s why the penalties for premeditated murder and manslaughter are exactly the same…

    Punishing especially heinous motives is an appropriate function of justice; there’s a huge difference between petty vandalism and spray-painting a swastika on a synagogue; both are illegal, but one is clearly meant to terrorize an entire class of people. So it is with murder and violence on the basis of immutable characteristics, like race, religion, gender, and sexual orientation. I can’t think of a more heinous motive than killing someone simply because of who they happen to be, not because of anything they have done, with the intention of intimidating everyone who belongs to their class.

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