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Surprise! So-called consulate in Benghazi was actually the site of a secret CIA operation!

2012-09-12T004406Z_01_EF13_RTRIDSP_3_LIBYA-US-EMBASSY-DEATH

Glenn Kessler, the fact-checker at the Washington Post, has more than a few juicy tidbits you probably didn’t know about the tragedy in Benghazi, Libya.

For example, various changes made to the Obama administration’s talking points on the violence in Benghazi — changes that are all the buzz among Republican conspiratorialists these days — are described by Kessler thusly:

This basically was a bureaucratic knife fight, pitting the State Department against the CIA.

In other words, the final version of the talking points may have been so wan because officials simply deleted everything that upset the two sides. So they were left with nothing.

And then there’s THIS from Kessler:

Although the ambassador [Christopher Stevens] was killed, the Benghazi “consulate” was not a consulate at all but basically a secret CIA operation which included an effort to round up shoulder-launched missiles. In fact, only seven of the 39 Americans evacuated from Benghazi had any connection to the State Department; the rest were affiliated with the CIA.

The official reports, such as the one from the Accountability Review Board and the Senate Homeland Security Committee Report, essentially dance around that uncomfortable fact…

So, from the State Department perspective, this was an attack on a CIA operation, perhaps by the very people the CIA was battling, and the ambassador tragically was in the wrong place at the wrong time. But, for obvious reasons, the administration could not publicly admit that Benghazi was mostly a secret CIA effort.

The talking points were originally developed by the CIA at the request of a member of the House Intelligence Committee. Interestingly, all of the versions are consistent on one point — that the attacks were “spontaneously inspired by protests at the U.S. embassy in Cairo,” a fact later deemed to be incorrect.

The talking points through Friday begin to become rather detailed, at which point there is sharp push-back from the State Department.

(Snip)

[I]n Washington, one should never underestimate the importance of internal conflict between agencies.

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11 Comments

  1. Ron Carlson

    That changes things dramatically if this is true right Pat.

  2. Ron: The CIA angle has been known in some circles for months, but Republican critics of the Obama administration have chosen to ignore it.

    Here’s an article six months ago:

    http://swampland.time.com/2012/11/02/report-benghazi-presence-was-a-cia-operation/

  3. expdoc

    I would think that by definition any U.S. consulate is a secret CIA operation.

  4. Robert

    expdoc, I’m with you on that perspecitve. The CIA (and the corresponding groups in other countries) works in many obscure and covert ways. Same goes for the NSA and FBI domestically. They have many front organizations. Remember the Valerie Plame incident? She was outed by people in the Bush administration in retaliation because her husband, another insider type, wasn’t playing along?

    Even people who pose as liberals/progressives and the opposite in many fringe organizations are there to get names and ideologies of the people who join said groups. This is why so often foreign journalists are killed in action, because they are suspected of being CIA or they are, but that will never be admitted to in the story of their deaths.

    These fake front organizations also act as front line in finding “loose cannon” types to do the dirty work for these organizations or sometimes to be the news you read about when some lone wolf of group of terrorist are caught before they’re able to do this or that horrible crime. Welcome to the world of espionage.

  5. Ron Carlson

    Thanks Pat for the link to the article it was a good read. I don’t like to make comments on things I don’t know much about and make wild accusations based on what certain news outlets or websites say. In my younger days I might have said something without knowing all the facts but as I’ve gotten older I try to take a common sense approach to things. That’s one reason I don’t post to often here I’m not very exciting and I won’t get into any arguments with fellow posters. I do however enjoy some of them and your put downs of them.

  6. Robert

    Ron, that’s a good perspective to operate under. There’s as much deliberate dis-information out there as there is valid.

    One thing I’ve discovered in trying to assess what story is the truth or close to it is, how hard is that person or whistleblower being attacked and discredited and by who and what organizations.

    For example, remember back during the primary elections in 2012? In Iowa, some Republican poll worker said that Romney didn’t win, Santorum did, but the news was Romney took Iowa. Then the Republican spin machine took over and began to demonize the poll worker, who was a Republican, to discredit him. Romney lost Iowa.

    Discrediting people is the main way people who expose the truth are discounted and made out to be someone who can’t or shouldn’t be trusted. Happens all the time.

    We live in very strange times. The integrity of the old news industry, before the need to fill the 24/7 news cycle and before much of the news industry was bought up by large corporations who are also part of the military industrial complex, will never be seen again in our lifetimes.

    Just because Pat puts up a story, doesn’t necessarily mean its the final and ultimate truth.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/19/rick-santorum-iowa-caucus-results-certified-_n_1215690.html

  7. Robert

    Did anybody see this story from today’s headline on the Huffington Post? Apparently Russia believes that an American diplomat is a CIA agent.

    Could it be construed that all diplomat’s from all countries are special agents for their country’s own CIA type services?

    (Sometime in the past 20 years, wasn’t there a story about Russia eavesdropping electronically on the US Consulate located in Russia.)

    “Ryan Fogle Detained By Russia, Accused Of Spying For C.I.A.”

    Are we heading for a complete worldwide breakdown of diplomatic relations will all countries, as no one trust the person in place isn’t an agent of each country’s intelligence gathering outfits?

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/14/ryan-fogle-cia_n_3271390.html

  8. Brian Opsahl

    Most republicans are really upset because the media other than fox isn’t picking up the Benghazi BS they are trying to shovel…9 hearings so far and absolutly nothing…

  9. Brian Opsahl

    He called it an act of terror the day after the attack in the rose garden…Fact..!!
    Just as bush did the same thing the day after 911…so what is the big deal anyway..?

  10. wilson

    Brian,
    The fact is the post says it is false. Pat has used the post’s Pinocchios in the past.
    Please provide the facts that dispute the Post’s assertions.
    Then send them to the Washington Post.
    Big deal?, none if you blindly believe the prevarications of this administration.

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