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Are teenagers becoming bored with Facebook?

FacebookTeens_m_0522

The explosion of social media over the past decade or so has always been a youth-driven phenomenon, although more than a few us geezers have also become addicted to this stuff.

But now there are signs that Facebook, the 800-pound gorilla of the social-media jungle, is losing a bit of its cachet among kids.

The story is HERE:

The good news for Facebook is that its business model is maturing.

The bad news for Facebook is that its audience is maturing, too.

Remember when Facebook was just something that kids used to procrastinate— a digital time-suck for kids and not a digital business? Well, now that’s switched. Facebook is definitely a digital business now, with last quarter’s revenue up 60 percent since last year and half of that coming from mobile, an astonishing achievement for a company that barely had a mobile business a year ago.

But where are the kids going? After months of denials, Facebook acknowledged yesterday that teens are losing interest in the site. “Our best analysis on youth engagement in the U.S. reveals that usage of Facebook among US teens overall was stable from Q2 to Q3, but we did see a decrease in daily users, specifically among younger teens,” CFO David Ebersman said.

In fact, this is a long time coming. Twitter finally eclipsed Facebook as the most popular social network for teens, according to a recent Piper Jaffray study. Among young people, Zuckerberg’s site is now tied with Instagram (his $1 billion purchase) for second place, having crashed from a huge lead last year…

Facebook is still a monster, claiming more than 500 million mobile daily active users.That’s more than the combined populations of the United States, Russia, France, and the UK visiting Facebook (and likely seeing ads on their phone) every day. It’s an astonishing thing …but falling engagement and enthusiasm among teens is a real problem… Young people’s Internet behavior predicts everybody’s Internet behavior. The fact that they’re getting bored could mean that Facebook is becoming boring—a dangerous idea for a company that relies on the idle time of average people.

Or it could just mean that Facebook has grown up right in line with its audience.

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1 Comment

  1. thehereandnow1

    They’re probably too busy asking themselves if they really are dumb enough to sign up for Obamacare.

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