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Gomer Gohmert calls for war against invading army of pre-teen children, most of whom are girls

The competition is stiff, but Rep. Louie Gohmert, the Texas Republican, is still ahead in the race for the title of Dumbest Member of Congress. HERE‘s his latest offensive: In a floor speech that was almost entirely overlooked somehow, Gohmert went full Buck Turgidson, suggesting that Texas use the authority granted by the U.S. Constitution to engage in a shooting war to fight off the undocumented immigrant children entering Texas. “Even with $3.7 billion that’s requested, there’s no way for what’s being called for is going to...

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Report: Thanks to Obamacare, federal spending on health care is declining

Don’t tell your right-wing friends about THIS. It will only confuse them. The growth of federal spending on health care will continue to decline as a proportion of the overall economy in the coming decades, in part because of cost controls mandated by President Obama’s health care law, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said on Tuesday. The budget office said in its annual 25-year forecast that federal spending on major health care programs would amount to 8 percent of gross domestic product by 2039, one-tenth of a percentage...

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Public support for impeaching Obama is no higher than it was for Bush seven years ago

Every once in a while, I come across a public-opinion survey that should have, but didn’t,  ask respondents whether they think most Americans agree with them on the matter at issue. You see, there’s a tendency among some folks to think that most people agree with them on political issues. I would love to see a poll, for example, in which respondents are asked a two-pronged question: 1. Should President Obama be impeached? 2. Do you think most Americans agree with you on this matter? It’s my guess that many, if not most,...

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Here’s how to get reluctant voters off their lazy, apathetic butts

Political scientists will tell you that people of certain demographic groups — the young and the poor, to cite two examples — vote less frequently than folks in certain other groups. Which raises a question posed HERE by Melissa Michelson: Is it possible to mobilize people who are otherwise uninterested in voting or reluctant to vote?   We now have good answers to these questions.  People who have not participated much before can indeed be moved to go to the polls. What really mobilizes these voters is repeated personal...

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BBC strikes a blow against false equivalence in the news media

On several occasions in recent years, I have warned here that a distorted sense of journalistic objectivity can sometimes give rise to false equivalence. Principles of journalistic balance and objectivity do not require, for example, that every story about medical advancements  include comments from an adherent of the Christian Science religion. Yes, there’s “another side” to almost every story, but good journalism doesn’t require coverage of that other side in every instance. Not all sides of a story are equal in...

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Why would anyone believe anything Dick Cheney says about U.S. foreign policy?

If Dick Cheney really wanted to do his country a great service, he would silently slink away from public notice, never to be heard from again. Instead, he persists in making a pest of himself, as we see HERE: Former Vice President Dick Cheney failed to anticipate the September 11 terrorist attacks and responded to them by urging the catastrophic invasion of Iraq, which will cost $6 trillion, roughly 5,000 American lives, and tens of thousands of serious injuries. In hindsight, it’s clear that Cheney’s assessment of pre-war...

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Poll: Most Republicans think Jesus would have opposed universal healthcare

A new poll commissioned by YouGov SHOWS that people of a certain political persuasion are highly delusional: According to the results of the poll, a majority of Democrats and independents have read the same version of Christianity’s Holy Book as I. For Republicans, however, it appears that, once again, they’ve conflated Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged with the Bible. Eighty percent of Democrats and 52 percent of independents said Jesus would support universal healthcare. Indeed it’s hard to imagine Jesus would deny care to those who lack the...

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Word to the wise: Don’t shoot pool with Barack Obama

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, who considers himself a pretty fair pool player, TELLS THE STORY of how he lost to Barack Obama one day last week: Mr. Hickenlooper said he was even thinking of slacking off on the theory it might not be a bad idea to let the president win. “And then, literally before my eyes he ran like four balls,” the governor said. Mr. Obama won. So they played another game. Double or nothing. $20 in the pot. And Mr. Obama won again. “I was playing as hard as I could possibly play,” Mr. Hickenlooper said. And yet … “I...

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Seven ways in which Paul Ryan has expressed his affection for Ayn Rand

Jonathan Chait has put together a baker’s half-dozen examples of things Rep. Paul Ryan has SAID OR DONE to express his affinity for the views of political philosopher Ayn Rand: 1. Spent the Bush years demanding larger, more regressive tax cuts than Bush himself was proposing, urging them to be less afraid of “class warfare.” 2. Spent the Obama years repeatedly proposing budgets that “would produce the largest redistribution of income from the bottom to the top in modern U.S. history.” 3. Listed Rand’s magnum opus, Atlas Shrugged, as one...

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Report: Bundy ranch standoff has spurred growth of extremist groups

We haven’t heard much lately about welfare rancher Cliven Bundy and his gun-toting admirers, but the perverted spirit of their ignoble cause is still with us, as we see HERE: The victory a Nevada rancher claimed in a government standoff with armed militiamen has served to embolden right-wing extremists and conspiracy theorists across the country, an organization that tracks hate groups said in a new report Thursday. The Southern Poverty Law Center based its findings on online chatter among extreme right-wing groups. Cliven Bundy’s...

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A lesson from the political lexicon: Not all conservatives are neo-conservatives

Every once in a while — far too often, as a matter of fact — I read or hear a reference to conservatives in general as “neo-cons.” The truth is that neo-conservativism is a distinct brand of right-wingery and should not be confused with other manifestations. This passage from Wikipedia is instructive: Neoconservatism is a political movement born in the United States during the 1960s. Many of its adherents rose to political fame during the Republican presidential administrations of the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s....

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Vast majority of Republicans who bought Obamacare coverage are pleased with it

The right-wing noise machine would probably dismiss THESE PEOPLE as RINOs (Republicans In Name Only): About three-quarters of Republicans who obtained health insurance under Obamacare are satisfied with their coverage, according to a survey published Thursday by the Commonwealth Fund. The survey found that 74 percent of Republicans said they were very or somewhat satisfied with their new coverage. Overall, 78 percent of Americans said they were satisfied: 73 percent of those enrolled in a private plan and 84 percent of those enrolled in...

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