Polls: Obama gets good grades for handling fiscal cliff, but Boehner decidedly does not

Two separate polls SHOW President Obama to have been a winner in the recent fiscal-cliff negotiations while House Speaker John Boehner was a big loser. In one of those polls, even one-fourth of Republican respondents say Obama did a good job. But then, that same poll also showed one-fourth of Democratic respondents approving of Boehner’s handling of the matter. Americans are largely split in their reaction to the “fiscal cliff” agreement, but united in their dislike for the role played by House Speaker John Boehner, according to a Washington Post/ABC pollreleased Tuesday… President Barack Obama won a majority of support for his handling of the crisis, as 52 percent of Americans approved of his approach, while 37 percent disapproved. John Boehner, by contrast, saw a 20-point net negative rating, with 31 percent approving and 51 percent disapproving of his handling of the deal… As a Pew poll released Mondayalso showed, Boehner’s low ratings come in large part from Republican unhappiness with his leadership. While Obama has broad support from Democratic voters, just 38 percent of Republican voters approved of Boehner’s work on the negotiations… Just 8 percent of Republican voters approved of the way Obama was handling negotiations in a December Post-ABC survey, while in the new poll roughly one in four (23 percent) said he had done a good job. Democrats jumped from 14 to 27 percent in approving of Boehner’s handling of the...

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Poll: Two-thirds of Republicans don’t like the fiscal-cliff deal, but two-thirds of Democrats do

Gallup sees a MIXED VERDICT: Americans are split over how they view the fiscal cliff compromise, with more Republicans being unsatisfied than Democrats, according to a recent poll. Overall, 45 percent say they disapprove of the Congress-approved plan to avert going over the cliff and 43 percent approve, accordingto a Gallup poll Friday. The rest are unsure. Among GOP participants: 27 percent approved the deal; 65 percent disapprove; the rest have no opinion. Among Dems: 67 percent approve; 23 percent disapprove; the rest have no opinion. How’d they think political leaders handled it? For President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden, pretty good. But bad news for Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Of Obama: 48 percent disapprove, 46 percent approve of his handling; of Biden: 42 percent disapprove, 40 percent approve; Boehner: 50 percent disapprove, 31 percent approve; Reid: 48 percent disapprove, 27 percent...

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Here’s a handy-dandy timeline of how the fiscal-cliff drama played out over the past two months

The resolution of America’s fiscal-cliff crisis, albeit a temporary fix in some regards, came exactly eight weeks after the November elections. If the back-and-forth on this matter over these two months seems like an unpleasant blur in retrospect, you can find some clarity by clicking HERE for a timeline of developments, which includes this cast of characters (in order of their appearances): Barack Obama, Harry Reid, John Boehner, Bill Kristol, Mitch McConnell, Nancy Pelosi, Tom Cole, Grover Norquist, Jay Carney, Tim Geithner, Eric Cantor, Joe Biden and Kevin...

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Senate approves fiscal-cliff deal by a wide bipartisan margin

America went over the so-called fiscal cliff with the arrival of Jan. 1, but disastrous consequences likely will be averted when the U.S. House signs off on a BIPARTISAN DEAL reached in the wee hours today in the Senate: The measure, which would raise tax rates for families making more than $450,000 and delay deep across-the-board spending cuts for two months, cleared the Senate by an overwhelming 89-8shortly after 2 a.m. The Republican-controlled House could take up the pact in a rare New Year’s Day session, though the timing of that chamber’s vote was not clear. The $620 billion agreement was a major breakthrough in a partisan standoff that has dragged on for months, spooking Wall Street and threatening to hobble the economic recovery. It turned back the GOP’s two-decade-long refusal to raise tax rates, delivering a major win for the president. The bill also canceled pay raises for members of Congress and averted an expected hike in the price of milk by extending expiring dairy policy. But as big a deal as it was, it did little to address the nation’s long-term deficit problem — there’s nothing in it to pare back entitlement spending — or to defuse a potential crisis over raising the debt ceiling that could come as early as February. The legislation now moves to the House, where Speaker John Boehner  has vowed to give any accord passed by the Senate its time on the House floor. GOP aides said a wide bipartisan vote would ease the bill’s passage through the House, but hurdles still remain. It remains to be seen whether House Republicans try to amend the package — a tactic that would surely sink the deal. ————– My view is that Boehner wouldn’t dare to preside over a sinking of the deal. He’ll wangle enough Republican votes — 30 or so, if not more — to ratify the Senate...

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Happy Fiscal Cliff Eve!

The situation in Washington regarding the so-called fiscal cliff might have changed by the time you read this post, but HERE‘s one interesting angle that pertains at this writing: To many Americans, what’s going on in Washington looks like a circus show that isn’t the least bit entertaining — the nation’s leaders seemingly unable to come up with a deal that keeps most people from paying higher taxes. But there is a logic to it. For all the posturing of the last few weeks, both sides see a measure of political upside in going over the “fiscal cliff” — or, at the least, an advantage in waiting until the last minute, since they want to avoid drawing the ire of their most loyal supporters by appearing to cave too quickly. (Snip) For both parties, there are some logical incentives to go over the cliff. Democrats are fresh off electoral victory in November and fighting a reputation that they too easily give ground. The way they see it, they’ll get what they want no matter what. Either they get a deal that includes tax increases on the wealthy or they go over the cliff. At that point, taxes would go up for everyone, and the Democrats would immediately move to cut rates for all but the wealthy. They may, in fact, get more of what they want by waiting. As of late Sunday, for instance, Democrats appeared willing to agree to raise rates only for those making more than $400,000. But if they go over the cliff, Democrats would have less need to negotiate and could seek to set that number at $250,000, their original goal. (Snip) Republicans, who control the House and still maintain a good bit of power in Washington, also see the merits of going over the cliff. Not voting for a deal means not voting for a tax increase, which has been a central tenet of the party for more than two decades. Many Republican lawmakers are loath to give up their purity on the issue, in part because they are more concerned about a primary challenge than their standing in national opinion polls. If they go over the cliff, they, too, could quickly move to cut taxes. In the meantime, they would seek to blame President Obama and other Democrats for the largest tax increase in generations. Many Republicans also believe they can get a better deal with Democrats in an upcoming debate over the nation’s debt limit. In about two months, the government will no longer be able to pay its bills unless Congress takes action to raise the limit on federal borrowing. Many in the GOP think that deadline gives them the upper hand....

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