Before even one vote has been counted, so-called liberal media say Republicans will prevail today

As we all know, conservatives have long been convinced that the mainstream media are biased in favor of Democrats in general and liberals in particular. But that theory doesn’t hold up if you examine how the media are portraying the likely results of today’s midterm elections. Everywhere you turn, the conventional wisdom among the newspaper pundits and the talking heads on television is that Republicans probably will win control of the U.S. Senate and expand their majority in the U.S. House. These foregone conclusions aren’t exactly calculated to spur greater turnout among Democratic voters. To the contrary, they’re more likely to discourage Democrats from participation. Of course, it’s not impossible that election results will defy the predictions. After all, some pundits are saying that some of the key races are pretty close. But a Democratic surge is less likely when the consensus among the pundits and headline writers is that it won’t happen. Then, too, the widespread presumption of Republican gains can create a bandwagon effect that pushes previously undecided voters into the GOP fold. The funny thing about all of this is that if Republicans fare as well as the pundits are predicting, that won’t bring an end to the right-wing complaints about the media’s liberal bias. To some people, cherished conspiracy theories are not easily shaken by evidence to the contrary.  ...

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Wacky new right-wing conspiracy theory: Social media are biased in favor of Barack Obama

  It was only inevitable, I suppose, that the familiar conservative meme regarding the liberal bias of the mainstream media would be expanded to cover the so-called new media. I noticed a harbinger of this trend about a year ago when some commenter here at Applesauce opined that the Internet was displaying a liberal bias. That notion is preposterous on its face, of course, considering that no one entity owns or controls the Internet. The stuff in cyberspace is comprised entirely of whatever people happen to place there, regardless of their politics. And now we have the looney theory that such media as Facebook, Twitter, Google and YouTube are in Barack Obama’s “back pocket.” Michele Bachmann, for one, is sure of it, as we see...

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Why are the mainstream media so much in love with Paul Ryan?

  If you’re one of those conservatives to whom the unswerving liberal bias of the mainstream media is an article of faith, don’t read THIS. It’ll only confuse you.

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If you frighten the horses, the liberal media will tell everyone about it

  Peggy Noonan had a COLUMN in The Wall Street Journal the other day in which she expressed concern that some of the Tea Party folks who got themselves elected to Congress a few weeks ago might be inclined to act a little “nutty.” The problem, as Noonan sees it, is not the nuttiness in itself but rather the likelihood that the mainstream media, with their liberal bias, will report such nuttiness. That’s exactly what the media did in 1994, when a new Republican Congress came to power, Noonan recalls. Those darned liberal reporters did all kinds of stories about the wacky rhetoric of the GOPers on Capitol Hill. To guard against a recurrence this time around, Noonan offers a suggestion to this year’s crop of right-wing Republicans: The point is when they want to paint you as nuts and yahoos, don’t help them paint you as nuts and yahoos. It’s good to keep in mind the advice of the 19th century actress Mrs. Patrick Campbell, who once said, speaking in a different context, that she didn’t really care what people did as long as they didn’t do it in the street and frighten the horses. That would be the advice for incoming Republicans: Stand tall, speak clear, and don’t frighten the horses. In other words, Noonan wants the weirdos to pretend that they’re not really weirdos. I expect, however, that her advice will be ignored for the most part. There’s more on this matter HERE and...

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Anatomy of a dishonest news headline about “death panels”

  Mark Warren EXAMINES the politics behind a newspaper headline that falsely likens a government decision regarding an ineffective drug to the onset of dreaded “death panels.” The purpose of such dishonesty, of course, is to stir fear among the booboisie (above). An excerpt: The basis for the “death panels” piece is last month’s FDA decision — by a vote of 12-1 — to no longer recommend the widely used cancer drug Avastin for use by late-stage breast cancer patients, because after further clinical trials, it has been determined that the drug (which was given provisional approval for the treatment of breast cancer in 2008 and is also prescribed for colon, kidney, lung, and brain cancer) is not effective for breast cancer patients. Got that? Not...

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