Musculoskeletal Pain During Pregnancy – You Don’t Have to Live With It!

Back pain and sciatic pain are common complaints during pregnancy.  Fortunately, physical therapy is available to help pregnant patients with these conditions.  Physical therapists trained in women’s health issues, can instruct prenatal patients with safe and appropriate exercises on land and/or in the pool.   Learning safe exercises can decrease the mom-to-be’s stress level and improve overall physical mobility.  Education on proper posture, proper supports to the joints, and proper body mechanics  (learning safe ways to move to...

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Incontinence – Ladies – You Don’t Have to Live With It!

Urinary incontinence can be frustrating, inconvenient, and can even limit social outings.  In the elderly population, it is sadly a large contributing factor to nursing home placement.  While some medical conditions can contribute to urinary incontinence and should be treated medically, quite often there is an underlying musculoskeletal dysfunction that can be contributing to the condition.  Some typical musculoskeletal problems can include: Pelvic floor muscle weakness (these muscles help “close the door” of the urethra (where...

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To Breathe or Not to Breathe During Second-Stage Labor….

Purple pushing, or directed pushing is a method used to help the mother push out the baby during second stage labor.  This occurs when the mother is told to push while holding her breath as long as she can.  This can lead to the mother damaging blood vessels in her face, hence the name “purple pushing.”  This type of pushing is often used if there has been an epidural or there is a lack of feeling in urge to push.  Purple pushing may be routine for the hospital or caregiver.  According to California Pacific Medical Center (www.cpmc.org), it...

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Prevent Pelvic Organ Prolapse! Fall into a Healthy Pelvic Floor Routine the Pilates and Pfilates Way!

Pelvic floor exercises (kegels) have been evidenced to increase pelvic floor strength, improve sexual function, improve bladder and bowel function, prevent further pelvic organ prolapse, and even decrease prolapse stage. When lower abdominal muscles are recruited, research has shown that healthy functioning pelvic floors, normally contract just before the lower abdominal muscles do, indicating that strengthening the lower abdominals should be a part of any pelvic floor strengthening program. Research also reveals that the “maximum strength...

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Would You Benefit from Pelvic Floor Therapy?

The pelvic floor consists of all neurovascular, visceral (organs) and myofascial (muscle and connective tissue) structures that are arranged between the pubic bone to the coccyx bone and laterally between the walls of the ischium. Typically, healthy pelvic floor muscles help maintain normal bladder and bowel function, as well as enhance sexual response.  When these muscles become weak or are in spasm, a person may experience urinary or bowel incontinence, as well as pelvic pain.  If the ligament structures that hold the pelvic organs up are...

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