David D. Alling, Part 2

D. D. Alling house, 826 N. Main St. in 1967 In last week’s post, we covered David and Rebecca Alling up through 1837. He built the house on So. Main Street, where they lived for 32 years.  Later on, in about 1885, he wrote about the game in the county. “Never saw a live Buffalo here but saw two carcasses one spr.1838       3 miles west on Kent’s Creek the other 2 or 3 years after on Kilbuck (Creek) bones entire with skull & c.” For a long time, Alling was the only carpenter in Rockford. By 1855, other carpenter...

read more

David D. Alling, Part 1;Came to Rockford in the morning; had a job by afternoon

David D. Alling was one of the early settlers in Rockford. He was born April 27, 1813 in Westfield, CT. At the age of 17, he apprenticed as a carpenter. On May 29, 1836, in New Haven, CT., he married Rebecca Botsford (born Dec. 27, 1813 in Derry, CT.) In September 1837, they started west on what became a difficult journey. They began by taking a steamer from New Haven, CT to New York, then Albany, NY, by boat, and then to Buffalo, NY, via the “raging canal.” After many delays, they arrived in Chicago, which was a collection of...

read more

826 N. Main St.

Have you ever gone by the white building at 826 N. Main St., the Carrie Lynn Children’s Center, and wondered about the history of the building? It was originally a home. David D. Alling and his wife Rebecca are first listed as living there in the 1874-75 Rockford city directory. The Allings had come to Rockford in October 1837; he was a carpenter and builder. Mr. Alling died in 1898, and his widow continued to live there until her death in 1903. Then W. W. Sawyer purchased the home and the Sawyer family lived there for many years. In...

read more

Goodyear Asa Sanford; an early settler

We have all heard of the earliest settlers, Germanicus Kent, Lewis Lemon, Thatcher Blake and Daniel Shaw Haight. But there are many other early settlers with interesting stories as well. One of them was Goodyear Asa Sanford. In June 1838, he ran the first boatload of produce down the Rock River. He had a flatboat loaded with produce, furs, and brooms. Mr. Sanford went to St. Louis, came back with a return load of sugar and molasses. His profit was about $500. That would have been a good annual income in that year. Mr. Sanborn was the first...

read more